EVENTS COMING UP. . . . . . . November 4th, from the Barclay's in Brooklyn, Wilder Vs. STIVERNE, HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP  November 25 the return of Kovalev, vs Shrabranskyy,light heavyweights, from the MSG theater in NYC . .December 9th Lomachenko Vs. Rigondeaux,superfeatherweights from MSG theater.. . >>>>>  stay tuned for updates at www.TruFanBoxing.com . . . 

 

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LONG ISLAND' OWN ALICIA NAPOLEON COMPETES IN FIRST  WOMAN'S TITLE FIGHT IN THE HISTORY OF NASSAU COLISEUM

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

LONG ISLAND, NY (July 7, 2017) - When boxing returns to NYCB Live, Home of the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, on Saturday, July 15, for the first time in 31 years, popular Long Island fighter Alicia "The Empress" Napoleon (7-1, 5 KOs) will make history participating in the venue's first ever female boxing match, as part of the evening's stacked undercard. Facing the experienced Mary McGee (23-3, 12 KOs), of Gary, IN, in a 10-round contest, Napoleon will challenge for her first world title, with the vacant IBF junior middleweight world championship at stake. The historic bout will not be televised, so boxing fans will need to be in the arena to witness the action.

Headlining the Premier Boxing Champions on FOX and FOX Deportes event will be an exciting clash between former world champions Omar "El Panterita" Figueroa (26-0-1, 18 KOs) and Robert "The Ghost" Guerrero (33-5-1, 18 KOs). The televised tripleheader also includes a battle of the Islands, as Staten Island's "Sir" Marcus Browne (19-0, 14 KOs) takes on Long Island native and fan favorite "Irish" Seanie Monaghan (28-0, 17 KOs) in a light heavyweight showdown, as well as an all-Polish heavyweight grudge match between Artur Szpilka (20-2, 15 KOs) and Adam Kownacki (15-0, 12 KOs). Televised coverage begins at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT.

"On the July 15 undercard, Alicia Napoleon, a local Long Island woman from Lindenhurst, will be going for her first world title, making history for both her and women's boxing," said Lou DiBella, President of DiBella Entertainment. "This will not only be the first women's world title fight at Nassau Coliseum, now the newly renovated NYCB Live, but it will be the very first women's boxing match held at the renowned venue. This historic bout adds to an already tremendous card that fans will not want to miss." 

 The Italian Napoleon, of Lindenhurst, is a powerful pressure fighter who, despite her exceptional technical ability, has a propensity to brawl to the delight of her passionate fan base. She trains out of Overthrow Boxing Club in Manhattan, a gym she co-owns and helped found in 2015. Napoleon grew up in Manorville, Suffolk County, Long Island, as an athletic youth, participating in every sport she could, before turning to boxing while a senior in high school. Amassing a 22-5 amateur record, Napoleon won two New York Golden Gloves titles, a National Golden Gloves title, two National bronze medals, three Metro belts, as well as winning the Empire State Games, Platinum Gloves and NYABC tournament. She turned pro in August 2014, and appeared on DiBella Entertainment's longstanding local boxing series "Broadway Boxing" three times on her way up the rankings. Competing in her first scheduled 10-round bout on January 29, 2016, Napoleon defeated Hungarian Szilvia Szabados via unanimous decision to capture the WBC Silver super welterweight belt. Now, with her first world title opportunity and fighting in NYCB Live's inaugural female boxing match, Napoleon is helping to bring well deserved recognition to women's boxing.

 "To fight for a world title at NYCB Live and to make history doing it is going to be an amazing experience," said Napoleon. "My opponent is a tough fighter, a volume puncher who comes forward, but I'll be prepared. I've been training like a beast since January.

"When I was born, my grandfather actually told my mom that I would be a boxer because I had big hands. I feel it was my destiny. I've always loved the mental and physical challenges of boxing. I love feeling empowered, pushing my limits, embracing pain and working through it. I love to channel fear and turn it into something positive. Nothing good comes easy.

 "Given the magnitude of this event, the level of opposition, fighting for a world title in the venue's first boxing card in over three decades, being a Long Island girl and making history, the pressure is on and I am going to shine bright like a light that night."

 Tickets for the live event, which is promoted by DiBella Entertainment, start at $50 (not including applicable fees). Tickets can be purchased online by visiting www.ticketmaster.com, www.nycblive.com or by calling 1-800-745-3000. Tickets are also available at the Ticketmaster Box Office at NYCB LIVE. Group discounts are available by calling 516-231-4848.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TWO-TIME OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALIST CLARESSA SHIELDS TO MAKE PROFESSIONAL TELEVISION DEBUT FRIDAY, MARCH 10 ON SHOWTIME

Two-time Olympic Gold Medalist Claressa Shields will make her professional television debut on ShoBox: The New Generation, a series that has sparked the careers of 67 future world champions, on Friday, March 10, live on SHOWTIME (10 p.m. ET/PT) from MGM Grand Detroit Event Center in Detroit, Michigan.

Shields (1-0) is facing Hungary's Szilvia "Sunset" Szabados (15-8, 6 KOs), a former world title challenger, in the first women's boxing match to headline on premium television. The fight will take place down the road from Shield's hometown of Flint, Mich.

Shields is the most accomplished amateur

in U.S. history - male or female - and the only American boxer to capture back-to-back gold medals at the Olympic Games.

"It is a dream come true to be the first woman to headline a boxing card on premium television," said Shields. "March 10 will be a historic night for boxing and all of the women who give so much to advance our sport. I am proud to be fighting for the NABF title in my second pro bout. I want to thank SHOWTIME, MGM Grand Detroit and Salita Promotions for this opportunity, and I will do everything to give my home state fans and the viewers a night to remember."

Szabados said, "Fighters always say their next fight is the most important one of their career, but you get an opportunity like this, and it really is. This is an unbelievable dream. I am very happy to be receiving this opportunity. I know this fight is important for Claressa also, and I don't really know what will happen in the ring. We both want to win. Claressa has more amateur experience, but I have more experience as a professional. It's going to be an exciting night."

Tickets for the event promoted by Salita Promotions go on sale Friday, Feb. 10 at 10 a.m. est and are priced at $250, $150, $100 and $50. They will be available at www.ticketmaster.com.

Promoter Dmitriy Salita said, "I am honored to be putting on this event at the fantastic MGM Grand Detroit, featuring American hero Claressa Shields on ShoBox: The New Generation. Detroit is America's greatest comeback city and I am thrilled that she has chosen MGM Grand Detroit as the site to fight for her first professional title on March 10. Although it is just her second professional fight, Claressa has chosen a former world title challenger for her opponent, a tough Hungarian named Szilvia Szabados, a woman who knows what's at stake if she can win that night. We've got a terrific card from top to bottom in support of this fantastic main event as well, featuring some of Detroit's brightest up-and-coming prospects, as well as some national and international flavor. Detroit deserves to have world-class events such as this and I'm very proud to be able to bring it here."

Shields won her first Olympic Gold when she was 17 years old in the inaugural women's boxing competition at the London Games in 2012. She defended her title at the 2016 Olympics in Rio, becoming the only American boxer to defend amateur sports' premier championship.

The 21-year-old Shields cruised to a 77-1 amateur record before turning professional last November, winning her first bout via unanimous decision on a non-televised undercard in Las Vegas. She now returns home as a headliner to take on the veteran Szabados in a six-round middleweight bout.

ShoBox expert analyst Steve Farhood: "Women's boxing in America has its best chance of revival because of the emergence of Claressa Shields. Women's boxing is pretty big in certain countries, but it really hasn't been a factor in the United States since Laila Ali and, before her, Christy Martin. Being the only U.S. boxer to win two gold medals, Claressa has instant credibility and star appeal and those two things are going to lead to wide exposure.

"She has a great back story, she's an exciting fighter to watch and she's instantly likeable."

Simply put, Shields found solace in boxing to overcome seemingly insurmountable challenges in her childhood. She's become a vocal advocate for many social causes, including the ongoing water crisis in her hometown of Flint, women's rights, and campaigning against sexual assault. An inspirational figure and motivational speaker, Shields represents a beacon of hope for a working-class city that struggles with violence, poverty, and everyday essentials.

In taking on a former world title challenger and fighting for the NABF middleweight championship in only her second fight, Shields continues to make immediate strides as a professional like fellow Flint native Floyd Mayweather, who won his first world title when he was 21.

Szabados challenged for a world title in July 2015 in her ninth professional fight, losing a decision to undefeated WBC Super Middleweight Champion Nikki Adler in Germany. The native of Miskolc, Hungary has faced two former world champions, Mikaela Lauren and Noni Tenge, and has won via knockout in three of her last five victories.

In her U.S. debut, Szabados lost a 10-round decision to then-undefeated prospect Alicia Napoleon on January 29, 2016, in Queens, N.Y. The 26-year-old has remained active since turning professional in 2014. She fought eight fights in 2016, and already has a win in 2017 via fifth round KO over Diana Marcz in January in Budapest, Hungary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

as some national and international flavor. Detroit deserves to have world-class events such as this and I'm very proud to be able to bring it here."

Shields won her first Olympic Gold when she was 17 years old in the inaugural women's boxing competition at the London Games in 2012. She defended her title at the 2016 Olympics in Rio, becoming the only American boxer to defend amateur sports' premier championship.

The 21-year-old Shields cruised to a 77-1 amateur record before turning professional last November, winning her first bout via unanimous decision on a non-televised undercard in Las Vegas. She now returns home as a headliner to take on the veteran Szabados in a six-round middleweight bout.

ShoBox expert analyst Steve Farhood: "Women's boxing in America has its best chance of revival because of the emergence of Claressa Shields. Women's boxing is pretty big in certain countries, but it really hasn't been a factor in the United States since Laila Ali and, before her, Christy Martin. Being the only U.S. boxer to win two gold medals, Claressa has instant credibility and star appeal and those two things are going to lead to wide exposure.

"She has a great back story, she's an exciting fighter to watch and she's instantly likeable."

Simply put, Shields found solace in boxing to overcome seemingly insurmountable challenges in her childhood. She's become a vocal advocate for many social causes, including the ongoing water crisis in her hometown of Flint, women's rights, and campaigning against sexual assault. An inspirational figure and motivational speaker, Shields represents a beacon of hope for a working-class city that struggles with violence, poverty, and everyday essentials.

In taking on a former world title challenger and fighting for the NABF middleweight championship in only her second fight, Shields continues to make immediate strides as a professional like fellow Flint native Floyd Mayweather, who won his first world title when he was 21.

Szabados challenged for a world title in July 2015 in her ninth professional fight, losing a decision to undefeated WBC Super Middleweight Champion Nikki Adler in Germany. The native of Miskolc, Hungary has faced two former world champions, Mikaela Lauren and Noni Tenge, and has won via knockout in three of her last five victories.

In her U.S. debut, Szabados lost a 10-round decision to then-undefeated prospect Alicia Napoleon on January 29, 2016, in Queens, N.Y. The 26-year-old has remained active since turning professional in 2014. She fought eight fights in 2016, and already has a win in 2017 via fifth round KO over Diana Marcz in January in Budapest, Hungary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alexandria Williams to make Pro Debut on October 1st in Chicago 

by Jay Monte

Alexandria Williams is a natural born athlete out of Long Island, NY. Having played football, softball, track and field and mainly basketball her whole life, she has always been involved in sports. She was an all Long Island basketball player in HS and a top rookie in division 2 college before joining the army. After her tour in Germany serving our country, her gym partner and friend, Titus Williams introduced her to the boxing world and she never looked back. She won the NY metro tournament and after two tries in the NY golden gloves, she won on her third try. She started her acting career but also missed the boxing gym so she decided to do both. She came back to the gym determined to make her mark in the pros. Her first test comes on October 1st as she makes her pro debut in Chicago against Jessica McCaskill.

Alexandria trains at the Freeport N.Y. PAL with head trainer Joe Higgins. Joe has trained hundreds of amateur champions and currently trains undefeated Light heavyweight pro Sean Monaghan (27-0 17 KO'S) and Light middleweight pro Patrick Day (12-2 6 KO's) as well as numerous other pros and amateurs. Joe feels that Alexandria is a very focused boxer that knows what it takes to grind out the lifestyle. He said that she listens well and executes, and that stamina will never be an issue for her. Joe thinks that Alexandria can be a poster girl for Women's pro boxing and that she is a pure athlete.

Alexandria pro boxing advisor is David Selwyn. David has managed and advised many female boxers ---under his managerial leadership Flyweight Eileen Olszewski won 3 World titles and Jill Emery won the IFBA World Welterweight title. Selwyn feels that with Alexandria's determination and athleticism she has what it takes to be another world champion boxer.

Team Williams would like to thank Women's boxing Hall of Famer Bonnie Cannino and legendary Chicago based Matchmaker Jerry Alfano for helping make this fight happen. This will be only female bout on the Warrior's Promotions boxing card at the U.I.C. Pavillion in Chicago Illinois on October 1st

Any inquires please write to Boxingkid@aol.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chronological Journey of Women Boxing

Bazooka

Epoch of women boxing dates back long before the Marquess of Queensbury rules and can be traced back to the 18th century.

Timetable begins with the Cockney Championess in 1722, London named Elizabeth ' The Cockney Championess" Wilkerson, defeated Martha Jones. They bit, scratched, kicked, and mauled. this was unregulated women boxing. The scene was even too gut wrenching even for a seasoned male audience.

Transverse one hundred and fifty years, 1876, and you'll realize how trivial female boxing was taken. The first female prize match was fought for a silver butter dish. The match was between Nell Saunders and Rose Harland in New York City,1876.The match was noted as the first female boxing in the United States.

1888 the first of boxing regulations were introduced, Marquees of Queensbury.

1904 Olympic Games Women boxing displayed in the third Olympic games in St. Louis.

1920 Beantown introduces boxing to women as a physical fitness and weight loss program.

1954 Now began the time when female boxers became of age, Barbara Buttrick always comes to mind. She was the first female boxer to have her bout broadcast nation wide.

Advance twenty years and women boxing began to take some hold and take notice. By 1975, Eva Shain was the first female to be granted permission, by Chairman Edwin B. Dooley, to judge professional boxing. Two years later in 1977 she was the first female professional boxing judge , and first female to judge a heavyweight title bout. The bout being Muhammad Ali vs Ernie Shavers, and first female judge @ MSG.

She made the Guinness Book of Sports. Unfortunately Eva Shain died of cancer in August 1999.

In 1975 the State of Nevada issued the first documented female boxing license to Caroline Svendsen.

1976 California issued Pat Pineda the first female boxing license.

1975-1978 was pukka years for female boxing. In a highly publicized law suit in the State of New York, three high profile women boxers Cathy “Cat Davis, Jackie Tonawanda and Marian “Lady Tyger' Trimial were among first time receivers of boxing licenses.

1977 Boxing ban is lifted in North Carolina after 100 years. From 1880 to 1977 the ban on boxing was instilled until November 1977 first female bout of Cathy “Cat” Davis vs Margie Dunson.

FYI !!! In 1978, actually there were sanctions amateur female boxing in Minnesota according to WBAN.

We can now juxtapose to 1979 when the ACLU represented Shirley “Zebra Girl” Tucker, in a case against California Boxing Commission and won to extend the number of rounds in female boxing to more than four rounds.

In an attempt to subjugate women fighters in Golden Gloves, U.S. District Judge Wendell Miles ruled against 19 year old Jill Lafler from participating in 1992 Golden Gloves.

As the clock went TICK,TICK, TICK women boxing stalled . Former World Women lightweight Marian “ Lady Tyger “ Trimiar, staged a thirty day hunger strike in 1987, and lost 30 pounds, in the process just to bring recognition boxing too promoters and the general public attention.

Ten years after;1992; Jill Lafler lost her case in U.S. District Court. Eight years stalled in Massachusetts Superior Court. Gail Grandchamp broke limits, with the ruling “ it was illegal to deny someone a chance to box based on gender'.

In 1993, Dallas Molloy faced stiffer opposition with USA Boxing Board of Governors to recognized female boxers. Eventually Malloy competed in a bout in Bellingham Washington with Mallory winning a split decision. Malloy win generates world publicity and some popularity.

That same year USA Boxing instill rules allowing Women amateur boxing in its amateur boxing program.

Jo-Anne Newman is seen as the first women to referee an amateur boxing event in the Junior Olympics.

Interesting of all!! through a bit of finagling Diedre Yumi Hamaguchi (Dee). Challenged New York Daily News Golden Gloves to include women in their events. Though Dee Hamaguchi is noted for breaking new grounds. It was done by an act of duplicity. She entered the competition by not revealing she was a women, by using a “D” in her application form when asked for first name not revealing her gender.

1996 was a progressive year for women boxing. Membership in amateur tournament increased to 360. Cristy Martin vs Deirdre Gogarty are called the bell wethers of modern professional female boxing. Both fighters were featured in a six rounder slugfest on the under card of Tyson vs Bruno, March 15,1996, in front of world wide audience and did it impressively.

Women made history in first Women National Boxing, Leona Brown became champ, 1997.

Another landmark lawsuit occurred against the British Boxing Board of Control in February 1998 in the UK. The lawsuit was brought about by Britain Jane “ The Fleetwood Assassin” Couch was refused a license by the B.B.B.C., so she traveled to the U.S. To compete in female professional boxing.

In 1999, the first women-vs man bout took place between Margaret McGregor against Loi Chow, which was determined to be an exhibition bout. But, this match caught international attention.

The end of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty first century has brought some change, in women boxing. We've had J'Marie Moore, Llaila Ali and Jacqui Frazier, having name recognition, all daughters of world champions. But, still women boxing struggles for world acceptance and and taken serious not trivially.

 

 

 

 

"AMAZING" KRESKIN IN FEMALE FIGHTERS CORNER

He was big in the 1970's, could make a man sheriff of a small town or Mayor of a big city. He appeared on talk shows with Muhammad Ali, travelled worldwide for six decades challenging the impossible with power of mind and suggestion. The Amazing Kreskin has now appeared on the boxing circuit, giving female boxer Heather Hardy some karma as she enters the ring at BB Kings in Times Square, New York on Wednesday Oct 15th.

Kreskin hopes to "power" Hardy to victory.

Hardy, whose last fight was a tough, controversial victory, hopes to improve her mental state for her upcoming bout, her breathing techniques, and her ability to relax when things get rough in there.

For those of you too young to remember Kreskin, or those who have just started to pick up the sweet science, the power of the mind can be a key to victory. Since boxing employs the secret of the psych, the fascination, the creativity of mind can differentiate between winning and losing. Kreskin believes the power of anticipation can help Hardy in the ring in her next bout.

"Heather is a remarkable Gal, and although I am not an expert in boxing, she is a very receptive subject" states Kreskin. "I tapped into her unconscious, and I programmed in her mind, (that) will awaken at the highest level all the stimuli around her, in this case her opponent. And although I don't want her to be a thought reader, I will give her an extra element, a higher level -- an anticipation of avoiding punches."

Ironically, Kreskin does not have an extensive history dealing with sports sorts, although he has been asked many times. "I have done it with individuals mainly on the circuit, but sports I have done sparingly, like bowlers and some professional players." He would like to work with teams, although he realizes it wouldn't be a short term deal.

Kreskin does have an extended history of meeting the icons of the ring, mainly Muhammad Ali and Joe Louis. "The boxing I grew up was Joe Louis-what a legend." says the Mentalist. And Ali once stated on the Tonight show "you give that guy (Kreskin) more time than I get."  "I admired Ali because he was an excellent fighter and a great Showman."

Kreskin realizes the value of sports, both amateur and professional, as it relates to the real world. "Sports can become a model of life, and most of the problems we have we create ourselves whether in sports or in lifestyle, and kids can learn from the competition -- for we learn far more from failures than successes."

"People don't realize what a sophisticated sport boxing is, and the bottom line is Heather still has to prove herself, as every boxer does" says Kreskin.   

JLM

 

 

 

 

 

“HAWAIIAN MONGOOSE” HOPES TO REACH HAWAII “FIVE O”

Teams with trainer/husband and Manager still strong.

 by J. Monte

They say love matches are made in heaven, and fight matches are made by one’s manager, and boxer Eileen Olszewski may have both, married to her trainer/husband, and inking a three year contract with her longtime manager David Selwyn. Olszewski hopes to reach the big “Hawaii 50”, eclipsing the mark of the "Old Mongoose", Archie Moore, (who actually fought till age 47) but I would not dare to ask a woman her age.

Born Eileen Miyoko Kuwaye in Honolulu Hawaii in 1968, Olszewski went into boxing after years of ballet, New York Knicks dancer and studying the martial arts, then at age 32 teaming up with trainer and future husband Matthew Olszewski, winning three national Golden Gloves and three NYC Golden Gloves before turning professional in 2006.

The team was completed when Selwyn agreed to take over her career. “I saw her first fight and was impressed” says Selwyn, who had never managed a fighter at the time. Since then Selwyn has managed eight fighters but remains with his first, a bond that has never been broken.

“David has been the best thing that has happened to us” says Matthew, adding that with a good manager, the stress of being a boxer is limited to just the battle that lies ahead, not the finances and worries that can stress a boxer out. I asked her why her longtime bond with her manager is intact and she replied with one word -- “honesty.” It’s a key to any relationship and it has kept the team together for almost a decade now – and still grows stronger to this day. Matthew describes boxing as “an exact science” meaning everyone plays their part. “I train and prepare her according to what Dave gives us as an opportunity, and Dave has given us great opportunities” said Matthew “whether it is a four or six rounder or a major international title bout.”

History/Culture/Longevity

Eileen, along with contemporary Alicia Ashley are the veterans of a woman’s fight culture that has been around, should I say, almost as long as they have. Don’t call them the deans of female boxing, since both are still active and very well seeing the ongoing evolutionary step of the female gender, its fistic footprint engineered to another level since the early days of Jackie Tonawanda and Cathy “Cat” Davis. Eileen still has a burning desire to box competitively in her mid -forties. She can fool you, like she did skeptics, into believing she is in her early thirties. Then again, the bond and team created have kept the pilot light lit after all these years.

 

Three time world champion.

During most of her career, she has been a flyweight champion -- WIBA champion 2008-2011, GBU champion 2010-2013, and since last September, she is the reigning IFBA champion, in fact, she became the oldest flyweight champion ever, male or female, in the history of boxing.

"When it comes to details and contracts, David is a savant” added Eileen, "that what makes him a good manager - good for me at least, but not for the promoter trying to get over, especially overseas."

Hoping to stay in the gym and box till the great "Hawaii 50" this ageless champ is still competing, and winning, at an elite level. At this time she is scheduled to fight an eight-rounder on Ronson Frank's Uprising Promotions on Sept 6th.

Although Eileen has been fighting on the local circuit, this doesn’t rule out a challenge overseas. Selwyn still hopes to get a bout in Europe, places they have fought before.

Despite having a modest 9-5-2 record, a closer look at the record of Manager and fighter and what they have accomplished --two PPV events and two Main Events in Italy, also a co-feature on a Felix Sturm bout held in Germany. In 2008, Eileen fought four world champion fighters with combined record of 52-4 -- and gained a championship belt in the process. The “Old Mongoose” Archie may be gone, but his spirit must be with the “Hawaiian Mongoose” - still is going strong in 2014.

Any Inquiries send to boxingkid@aol.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Last updated: 10/15/17.